Harvest Time

Harvest Time

The Autumn of spirit has arrived. Now is the time for the harvest. 

If the seeds you have planted all year were good then you will have a bounteous feast. If the seeds you planted were bad your fruit will be rotten and the autumn will be harsh on you.

But those who have wasted the year in trivial pursuits have it worse: their autumn will be barren and empty and the seasons will seem meaningless to them.

All three, those who plant good seeds, those who plant bad seeds, and those who plant no seeds are all learning the wisdom of the seasons.

That all seasons are in communication with the seasons that came before, and you cannot escape what you have sown.

Sooner or later, it catches up to you.

Harvest Time

Forgiveness, empathy, understanding, reconciliation are not isolated events.

They are fruits that were nourished in other seasons – a winter of pain, a spring of rebirth, and a summer of flight must occur before we can harvest the fruits of our labor represented in The Reconciliation that is forgiveness and empathy.

Trust the wisdom of your emotions – allow them to be expressed, and on the road of processing these feelings, you will find that destinations such as empathy, forgiveness, understanding and reconciliation rise up to meet you, instead of you choosing them before the time is right.

In the interim, we still mustn’t let others drive us toward hatred, or fear of another. 

We must resist the urge to express the worst parts of our being. 

We must choose love, always. But even if we are in a moment that we cannot, for the life of us, love the person who hurt us, when we are just not in the place to forgive them, or even in a place to want to understand their choices that led to them hurting us, we must, at the very least, choose to love ourself.

Our energy is better used to be for something and not against something, for what “resists shall persist” – be for love then, be for healing, be for peace.

Getting Out of Victim Identity

We must get out of “victim” identity. It may have been a fact that you were–or are–a victim but this is not who you are. 

You are far greater than the things that stopped you or hurt you. The way you recover from being a victim, is recognizing that although being a victim could be a fact of you life, it is not something that eclipses who you are.

You are powerful, you are wise, you are stronger than this, whatever is that currently plagues you.

Tap into this power, tap into this wisdom, tap into this strength and it shall save you.

You are also not a victim of life either–this is not about faulting you for everything that has occurred to you: no, it is about taking responsibility for your choices, and how you reacted to the things which came your way, ill or well. 

How you reacted to what happened to you will be more important than what happened to you in the final chapter.

Reaping What You Have Sown–Finally.

Summer is a time for joy and expansion. A time to prepare for the harvest. We rejoice in the signs that our dreams are about to bear fruit and we practice patience and humility.

Life becomes a waiting game for miracles to happen. We thank the miracles for winking at us from afar and we know that to reach them we must honor this moment and experience what it means to wait and what waiting can teach us.

Trusting, faith, perseverance are all lessons of the summer.

But now, in Autumn, the time for reaping has arrived. The seeds you have sown are now bearing fruit within you. If they were seeds of light and positivity yours will be a joyous harvest but if you have planted seeds of negativity your harvest will be bare and harsh.

But have no fear: you can turn things around even now by choosing the path of love, positivity and healing today and promising to keep true to yourself and never be false to anyone.

Preparing For The Harvest

The ancient fairytales and folklores of all human civilizations had stories about sorceresses or magic beings disguised as paupers begging for alms from the proud, the wealthy, the privileged.  And when the nobles turned up their noses to these hidden magical beings and rejected them in disgust during the cold winter months, the magical men, or spirits of nature, would return in the autumn to curse the harvest of the nobles.

No food would grow.

There is something more to these tales than pure fantasy. There is wisdom in it, hard to understand at face value, but always provable in practice, and through first-hand experience.

Life is kinda like a fairytale. But instead of haughty noblemen rejecting beggars, we are stubborn humans who reject the crying wounds within our hearts.

The Prince, or The Pauper?

There is another common troupe in fairylore, an about-face to the previous trope: that of noblemen, like princes, escaping the confines of their palace, to spy among the peasants, to see how loyal they truly our to their king. When it is finally revealed that the pauper is truly the prince those peasants who revealed themselves as disloyal are quickly round up and throw in jail or killed, while those who are loyal are given special favor from the king from then on.

Here again, we have something hidden in the story that has nothing to do with royalty or poor people:

Beware of princes in paupers clothing, the story is telling us, for they will sneak into your life unannounced in order to test your loyalty to the one true King.

They appear to be one thing but really are another: they are disguised for a reason – if you knew it was a test, you’d put on your best mask speaking about how you are so loyal to his majesty.

But with a prince hidden as a pauper, you will unmask yourself very easily and if you really do not practice what you preach you will be revealed as who you really are.

Be kind to all, then. Be kind to all that is in your heart too, as it surfaces.

Anyone could be a prince or princess hidden in paupers clothing, testing your loyalty to your better nature.

Ensure that you will have a bounteous harvest, then, by practicing equanimity to your own heart and the heart of others.

Much love,

Ollin

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Categories: Writer's Journal